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Go Back   Chevy HHR Network > General Discussion > "How To" Tutorial Library > Repair Key Fob Remote's worn out contacts
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"How To" Tutorial Library Write tips and instructions on how to install parts or fix problems. This is for detailed "How To's" only, not a forum to ask how to do something. Please post those questions in appropriate forums.

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Old 07-21-2010, 12:49 AM   #1
whopper
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Repair Key Fob Remote's worn out contacts

Admin has merged two How To's for this issue. The second option starts at Post #40

Over time, the "carbon" buttons on the inside of the remote will wear out (like mine did) where cleaning the circuit board and the button's contact will no longer work without numerous presses on the external buttons.

Until I did this repair, I had to hit the lock/unlock anywhere from 1 to 30 times before it would work.

Give this fix a try if cleaning the insides no longer helps. Of course if you screw up your remote, you are on your own. I know it worked well for me - and I hope it works for you (and saves you buying a new remote and having to get it programmed for your HHR).

(I am assuming the battery solder joints are secure and isn't the problem to begin with - see http://chevyhhr.net/forums/showthread.php?t=22641 for details on how to repair broken solder joints at the battery mount)

Materials needed:

1) your worn out remote (of course)
2) a very sharp razor/exacto knife
3) a tube of 100% Silicone - I used GE Silicone 1 after testing everything from crazy glue to gorilla glue - nothing else would stick to the silicone keypad inside the remote
4) a toothpick to apply the silicone
5) a silicone keypad from an unused/unneeded device or even a tv remote (I used a keypad from an electronic labeller that was broken)

Step 1:
take the key fob remote apart, and lay it out with your other materials
Click the image to open in full size.


Step 2:
Select, and cut out one of the rubber buttons from your salvaged silicone keypad
Click the image to open in full size.


Step 3:
Using the razor/exacto knife - trim off the "carbon" button from the end - cut it THIN, but not too thin. You will want a very thin layer of the gray/white silicone to back the "Carbon"
Click the image to open in full size.

This is a crappy shot, but it may give you a better idea on how thin/thick to cut it:
Click the image to open in full size.

Step 4:
Now this step requires a bit of finese - very carefully trim off the existing "Carbon" buttons on the key fob remote - you will need to press it in from the other side to make the button stand up so you can make a clean cut.

Once it is cut off, continue trimming the indentation where the button was, to make the recess a little deeper - the new button will be a bit deeper than the one you removed.

Once the indentations are trimmed back, trim your new Button replacements so they fit the indentation.

Here is a shot taken once the original buttons were removed, and the indentations trimmed a little deeper. One of the original buttons that was cut off and the two new ones (trimmed to fit) are shown here:
Click the image to open in full size.

Step 5:
Using the toothpick apply a SMALL drop of the Silicone I to the indentation, and place one of the replacement buttons into it - press it down square, and immediately clean off any excess that squeezes out. DO NOT GET ANY OF THE SILICONE ON THE WORKING SURFACE OF THE NEW CARBON BUTTON (if you do, remove it, and make a fresh one, and apply it instead)

Let it dy to set up for a couple of minutes, then do the other button, making sure not to disturb the first one.

Click the image to open in full size.

Step 6:
Let it dry for at least an hour or two - preferably overnight.

Step 7:
Clean the contacts on the circuit board (I use alcohol on a lint free microfibre cloth), reassemble the key fob remote, go out to your car and give the buttons a try.

If it didn't work, disassemble and inspect the business side of the keypad, for silicone that fouls the button, or the circuit board.

If you mess it up BIG TIME - you can always buy a new remote and swap silicone key pads to save having to get the new remote programmed.

Good luck.

Last edited by ChevyMgr; 04-12-2013 at 12:31 PM. Reason: admin edit
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Old 07-21-2010, 09:39 AM   #2
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glad you took pictures. I did this over a yr ago to a remote for a Cobalt. If you don't have an old remote for the pad material, you can always find cheap calculators in stores for about a buck and sometimes less to take apart for the pads.
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Old 07-21-2010, 10:38 AM   #3
whopper
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Good idea. Well worthwhile for a buck or two.
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Old 07-21-2010, 10:56 AM   #4
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Great writeup, I'm always salvaging parts from stuff for repairs.... Just take a look in my basement..... Second thought, you better not.
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:43 PM   #5
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While I like your DIY "cut & paste"; here is a ready-made product that coats the existing carbon buttons to restore conductivity.

http://www.chemtronics.com/products/product.asp?id=32

I've had both good and bad luck with it. This product is expensive, best used if you have lots of contacts to treat and the product must be fresh, less than 6 months old. I've used it on a bunch of telephones, but nothing lasts forever.
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Last edited by Sno White; 07-28-2010 at 02:52 PM. Reason: added link I forgot
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Old 08-03-2010, 01:22 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sno White View Post
While I like your DIY "cut & paste"; here is a ready-made product that coats the existing carbon buttons to restore conductivity.

http://www.chemtronics.com/products/product.asp?id=32

I've had both good and bad luck with it. This product is expensive, best used if you have lots of contacts to treat and the product must be fresh, less than 6 months old. I've used it on a bunch of telephones, but nothing lasts forever.

Good find - and definitely worthwhile keeping in mind. I have also heard that the repair kits for the rear window heating elements will work as well.
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Old 09-22-2010, 03:15 AM   #7
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Our second remote was also getting worse and worse with being reluctant to open/lock the doors, so it finally got me riled up enough to tear it apart and repair it as well.

This time I found it would work even better by hollowing out the area where the original carbon buttons are removed, as the first one is a bit too sensitive to the touch. So this time I made sure the replacement carbon contact was recessed just a shade below the surrounding area. It works even better than the first one I repaired.
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Old 11-04-2010, 02:01 PM   #8
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I’ve been informed the direct link to the product I provided in Post #5 does not work.

Currently it is at:
http://www.chemtronics.com/
Select your Region..
Then select “Electronics”
Go to the “Products” tab – select Circuitworks
Then “CircuitWorks® Rubber Keypad Repair Kit”.
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Old 11-13-2010, 09:14 AM   #9
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remote contact repair

Scroll down to snow whites reply on 11-04. chemtronics. I did this and it is working great-I think I might have gone alittle thick on the coating, but so far I have no complaints. the dealer Wanted $180 for new fob and programming-this repair cost me $23 including shipping. thanks to Snow White and to the form- You guys rock!!!!!!
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Old 12-15-2010, 06:09 PM   #10
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forget the conductive carbon and silicon in dots made of aluminum foil.
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Old 12-15-2010, 06:09 PM
 
 
 
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